Come Yeshua, Come! How do I Celebrate Rosh Hashanah? | Ron Cantor

from Messiahs Mandate:

Last night began Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. It is a joyous time where we here in Israel greet each other with Shana Tova and Ketiva VaChatima Tova—Happy New Year and May you be inscribed for a good year. Here is the problem. According to the Bible, Rosh Hashanah comes on the first day of the seventh month!

The Lord said to Moses, “Say to the Israelites: ‘On the first day of the seventh month you are to have a day of sabbath rest, a sacred assembly commemorated with trumpet blasts. Do no regular work, but present a food offering to the Lord.’” (Lev. 23:23-25).

The first day of the seventh month is actually as far as you can be from a New Year. Furthermore, there isn’t even a hint in the passage that it is a New Year. The words Rosh Hashanah are nowhere to be found. It is hard to imagine that God expected us to celebrate a New Year that doesn’t exist. In truth the name of the holiday that is to be celebrated on the first day of the seventh month is Yom Teruah or, the Day of Blasting Shofars, Feast of Trumpets!

– See more at: http://messiahsmandate.org/come-yeshua-come-how-to-celebrate-rosh-hashanah/#sthash.rRRwG562.dpuf

Rosh Hashanah-Awakening to Judgment | Hebrew 4 Christians

For those that are wondering what Rosh Hashanah is and how to observe it, I recommend this great resource from Hebrew4Christians.com

Rosh-Hashanah_1024-768Rosh Hashanah – The Jewish New Year

In traditional Judaism, Rosh Hashanah (lit. “the head of the year”) is celebrated as Jewish New Years Day. The holiday is observed on the first two days of the Hebrew month of Tishri (i.e., the seventh “new moon”of the year), which usually falls in September or October, and marks the beginning of a ten-day period of prayer, self-examination and repentance (aseret yemei teshuvah), which culminates on the fast day of Yom Kippur. These ten days are referred to as Yamim Norai’m (יָמִים נוֹרָאִים), the “Days of Awe,” or the High Holy Days. Rosh Hashanah also commemorates the creation of the universe (בְּרִיאַת הָעוֹלָם) by God.

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